Undergraduate

PHL111/111E, PHL111F Introduction to Philosophy
Purpose: To introduce the nature, methods, history and basic issues of the philosophical tradition
Contents: What is philosophy? Dialogical character of philosophy. Nature of philosophical questions and answers. Branches of philosophy. Variety of philosophical approaches. Some historical periods of philosophy. Why is philosophy important in post-colonial contexts?
Instruction: Lectures, self-study packets, tutorials
Credits: 8
Assessment: Continuous assessment through tests, group work, assignments
Summative Assessment: 2 hour examination
Prerequisites: None
 
PHL112/112E, PHL112F Elementary Logic
Purpose: To introduce Elementary Logic as one of the primary branches of philosophy and basis of all scientific thinking
Contents: The Argument (premises and conclusions, form and content, truth and validity, probability). Practical Logic: Material fallacies and Linguistic Fallacies. Formal Logic: standard form categorical syllogisms, Venn diagrammes, truth tables.
Instruction: Lectures, self-study packets, tutorials
Credits: 8
Assessment: Continuous assessment through tests, group work, assignments
Summative Assessment: 2-3 hour examination
Prerequisites: None
 
PHL116/116E Logic and Ethics for Law Students
Purpose: To introduce basic reasoning skills (Elementary Logic) and more specifically moral reasoning competencies (Ethics) essential to Legal Training.
Contents: The Nature of Logic, The Structure of Arguments, The Role of Language, Arguments and Non-arguments, Deductive and Inductive Arguments, Truth,Validity and Soundness, Fallacies, The Nature, Function and Need of Ethics, Core Ethical Issues, Comparison of Ethical Approaches, Applied Ethical  Problems.
Instruction: Lectures, self-study packets, tutorials
Credits: 16
Assessment: Continuous assessment through short class tests and tutorial exercises
Summative Assessment:  2-3 hour examination
Prerequisites: None
 
PHL126/126E, PHL126F Classical problems in Philosophy 
Purpose: To introduce the themes of Ancient Greek, African, Asian and South American philosophy and their relation to the development of contemporary issues in philosophy.
Contents: Classical problems such as matter and mind, truth, knowledge, morality, reason, community and identity will be discussed.
Instruction: Lectures, self-study packets, tutorials
Credits: 8
Assessment: Continuous assessment through tests, group work, assignments
Summative Assessment: 2 hour examination
Prerequisites: None
 
PHL125/125E, PHL125F Ethics
Purpose: To present Ethics as one of the major branches of the philosophical tradition, and demonstrate its use, relevance and significance for everyday life, as well as in select professions.
Contents: Introduction to metaethics. Comparison of selected ethical theories (Virtue ethics, Deontology, Utilitarianism, African moral theories).  Applied ethical problems.  
Instruction: Lectures, self-study packets, tutorials
Credits: 8
Assessment: Continuous assessment through tests, group work, assignments
Summative Assessment: 2-3 hour examination
Prerequisites: None
 
PHL215/215E Theories of Knowledge
Purpose: To introduce modern (Renaissance and Enlightenment) and contemporary theories of knowledge.
Contents: The historical context of Renaissance and Enlightenment philosophy and epistemology and its relation to contemporary epistemological problems: the sources, nature, and validity of knowledge, the justification of true beliefs, epistemic injustice. 
Instruction: Lectures, self-study packets, tutorials
Credits: 8
Assessment: Continuous assessment through tests, group work, assignments
Summative Assessment: 2-3 hour examination
Prerequisites: PHL111/111E
 
PHL216/216E Theories of Human Nature
Purpose: To introduce the development and themes of theories of human nature as core to the humanities and the sciences.
Contents: What does it mean to be human? Comparative analysis of some of the various views of human being from different times and cultures: such as in African, Asian, and Western thought. 
Instruction: Lectures, self-study packets, tutorials
Credits: 8
Assessment: Continuous assessment through tests, group work, assignments
Summative Assessment: 2 - 3 hour examination
 
PHL227/227E Metaphysics
Purpose: To introduce Kant’s prolegomena to modern Metaphysics and contemporary problems of Metaphysics.
Contents: Kant’s critique of Metaphysics. Contemporary problems of Metaphysics: modality, space and time, the nature of knowledge, persistence and constitution, causation, freedom and determinism, the mental and the physical. 
Instruction: Lectures, self-study packets, tutorials
Credits: 8
Assessment: Continuous assessment through tests, group work, assignments
Summative Assessment: 2-3 hour examination
Prerequisites: PHL123/123E
 
PHL224/224E Social and Political Philosophy
Purpose: To introduce the main aspects and trends of social and political philosophy.
Contents: Individualism and communalism. Liberty and Liberation. Justice and Injustice. Equality. Democracy. The social contract. Concepts of the State. Citizenship and rights. 
Instruction: Lectures, self-study packets, tutorials
Credits: 8
Assessment: Continuous assessment through tests, group work, assignments
Summative Assessment: 2-3 hour examination
Prerequisites: PHL124/124E
 
PHL311/311E Philosophical Hermeneutics
Purpose: To introduce the historical development, theories, and contextual significance of Philosophical Hermeneutics. 
Contents: History of hermeneutics. Hermeneutical theories: Schleiermacher, Dilthey, Betti, Heidegger, Gadamer, Apel, Habermas. Ricoeur, Serequeberhan. Significance of hermeneutics within the context of literature, film, art, theology, and socio-cultural texts. Application of hermeneutics, for instance, to Liberation- and Black Theology and protest art.
Instruction: Lectures, self-study packets, tutorials
Credits: 16
Assessment: Continuous assessment through tests, group work, assignments
Summative Assessment: 3 hour examination
Prerequisites: PHL211/211E
 
PHL312/312E Contemporary Philosophical Trends
Purpose: Overview and comparative analysis of the most influential trends in 20th century philosophy
Contents: Pragmatism. Phenomenology and Existentialism. Analytic philosophy. Critical Theory. African philosophy (capita selecta).
Instruction: Lectures, self-study packets, tutorials
Credits: 16
Assessment: Continuous assessment through tests, group work, assignments
Summative Assessment: 3 hour examination
Prerequisites: PHL212/212E
 
PHL323/323E Philosophy of Science
Purpose: Analysis of the major issues in contemporary philosophy of science
Contents: Concepts of science. Critical reflection on the scientific method (Popper, Kuhn, Lakatos, Feyerabend). Types of knowledge and epistemic norms. Indigenous knowledge and Western science. Status of the social sciences.
Instruction: Lectures, self-study packets, tutorials
Credits: 16
Assessment: Continuous assessment through tests, group work, assignments
Summative Assessment: 3 hour examination 
Prerequisites: PHL223/223E
 
PHL325/325E African Philosophy
Purpose: To introduce the main tenets, debates and schools that constitute present-day African philosophy.  
Contents: Debate about the identity of African philosophy.  Trends and representatives in contemporary African philosophy.  Dialogue between western and African philosophies.  Significance of African philosophy. In-depth study of selected themes and authors.
Instruction: Lectures, self-study packets, tutorials
Credits: 16
Assessment: Continuous assessment through tests, group work and assignments
Summative Assessment: 3 hour examination
Prerequisites: PHL224/224E