Undegraduate

First Year Modules: 

 

HSH111/ HSH111E Introduction to Human Settlement

Purpose: This module introduces students to some of the key issues around the history of settlement planning in South Africa, including various forms of land tenure systems; pre-colonial chiefdoms and communal settlements; colonial conquest, dispossessions, surveyed and designated settlements as well as the segregation model of the early twentieth century. The contemporary processes of socio-spatial reconstruction in the post-apartheid era also form part of the topics on this module. The topics include sustainable human settlement legislation as well as regulations around land-use management.

 

HSH122/HSH122E Introduction to Human Settlement

Purpose: This module introduces students to some of the key issues around the history of settlement planning in South Africa, including various forms of land tenure systems; pre-colonial chiefdoms and communal settlements; colonial conquest, dispossessions, surveyed and designated settlements as well as the segregation model of the early twentieth century. The contemporary processes of socio-spatial reconstruction in the post-apartheid era also form part of the topics on this module. The topics include sustainable human settlement legislation as well as regulations around land-use management.

 

HSS111/HSS11E Introduction to the Concept of Development

Purpose: The course introduces learners to the economic, political, social, cultural, environmental and human aspects of development. It gives a discursive analysis of development to denote its diversity of meaning by theorists and development practitioners. Its aim is to enable learners to understand competing theories of development which include (among others) modernization, dependency, world systems, neoliberalism, human development and sustainable development

 

HSS122/HSS122E

Purpose: The course introduces learners to the economic, political, social, cultural, environmental and human aspects of development. It gives a discursive analysis of development to denote its diversity of meaning by theorists and development practitioners. Its aim is to enable learners to understand competing theories of development which include (among others) Basic Needs; neoliberalism, human development and sustainable development; and Role of the state, civil society and citizens in development.

 

HSP111/HSP111E Introduction to Public Administration & Public Policy

Purpose: The course enables the learner to acquire basic knowledge of Public Administration and Management. The course provides the learner with an understanding of the origins of public administration, principles for carrying out public administration, the environment in which public administration is carried out and the interaction between public administration and its environment. The course also introduces the learner to the concept of governance.

 

HSP122/HSP122E Selected Themes & Policies in the South African Political Economy

Purpose: The first part of this course introduces learners to the political and economic background to the post-colonial and apartheid state in South Africa. It examines key strategies for political domination and economic exploitation by the ruling class in the form of land expropriation and attempted social engineering through key legislation and the implementation thereof. The second part critically engages with the main strategies of the post-apartheid state to achieve redress and transformation through the RDP and GEAR, and the more recent broader-based programme based on a holistic conceptualisation of human settlement.

 

Second Year Modules

 

HSH211/HSH211E Transformation in Human Settlement

Purpose : This module builds on the first year introductory one by focusing on issues of settlement planning in the ‘homelands’, towns and cities. The topics include expanding reserves and growing urban slums; apartheid towns/cities; the bantustan policy as well as associated land tenure systems. The module also covers issues around socio-spatial and economic spaces in South African cities and towns of the 1920s and 1930s. Additionally, the module begins to introduce students to some of the theoretical ideas around ‘new urbanism’ and its associated practices. Some links are made regarding the South African spaces (and the Inner City Areas in particular), the activities of the informal economy and livelihoods are also introduced. These are just some of the broad ideas around which a more detailed course-guide will be built by the lecturer concerned.

 

Prerequisites: HSH111/ HSH111E/ HSH122/HSH122E

 

HSH221/HSH221E Transformation in Human Settlement

Purpose : This module builds on the first year introductory one by focusing on issues of settlement planning in the ‘homelands’, towns and cities. The topics include expanding reserves and growing urban slums; apartheid towns/cities; the bantustan policy as well 4

as associated land tenure systems. The module also covers issues around socio-spatial and economic spaces in South African cities and towns of the 1920s and 1930s. Additionally, the module begins to introduce students to some of the theoretical ideas around ‘new urbanism’ and its associated practices. Some links are made regarding the South African spaces (and the Inner City Areas in particular), the activities of the informal economy and livelihoods are also introduced. These are just some of the broad ideas around which a more detailed course-guide will be built by the lecturer concerned

Prerequisites: HSH111/ HSH111E/ HSH122/HSH122E

 

HSS211/HSS211E Sustainable livelihoods and human settlements

Purpose : This course aims to enable learners to understand the complexities of explaining and understanding livelihoods, especially those of poor people. It focuses on the main factors that affect poor people’s livelihoods, the typical relationships between these factors and the assets used by the poor to ameliorate poverty. It places poor people at the centre of a web of inter-related influences that affect how these people create livelihood strategies and portfolios for their households. It interrogates how poor people use their livelihood assets which include human, financial, physical, natural and social capital to construct a portfolio of livelihood strategies for subsistence in their different communities.

Prerequisites: HSS111/ HSS111E/ HSS122/HSS122E

 

HST211/HST211E Social Statistics

Purpose : The main aim is to provide a comprehensive introduction to social statistics and quantitative reasoning in the social and behavioural sciences through lectures and practical laboratory sessions. Students will learn how social statistics are used in the description and analysis of social science data.

 

HST221/HST221E Social Statistics

Purpose : The main aim is to provide a comprehensive introduction to social statistics and quantitative reasoning in the social and behavioural sciences through lectures and practical laboratory sessions. Students will learn how social statistics are used in the description and analysis of social science data.

 

HLP211/HLP211E Introduction to the Law of Property

Purpose: The module is designed to provide the students with a basic understanding of the nature, scope and development of the Law of Property in South Africa and its place in the general law of South Africa. In particular it aims to familiarise students with the impact of the Constitution on property rights and, more especially on statutory ownership, common law land ownership and indigenous forms of tenure.

 

HLP221/HLP221E Land Use and Planning Law

Purpose: This module will build in the learning achieved in the Introduction to the Law of Property module. It will examine the common law, legislative and court jurisprudence relating to land use in South Africa, particularly in inhabited areas. To this end particular attention will be paid to the Spatial Planning and Land Use Management Bill 2012. The focus of the module, however, is not just on the law itself, but on the policy implications of various rules, doctrines and practice in this area. Legal rules regulating land use are among the most fundamental to South African Society and economy. Over the past few decades South Africa has seen a significant shift in the number and nature of regulatory tools planning authorities have sought to use to achieve a balance between the dictates of (human and economic) development and environmental management.

 

Third Year Modules

 

HSH311/ HSH311E Post-apartheid Transformations in Human Settlement

Purpose: This module focuses specifically on issues of transitions and transformations of the South African settlement landscapes 

Prerequisites: HSH211/ HSH221E/

 

HSH321/ HSH321E Post-apartheid Transformations in Human Settlement

Purpose: This module focuses specifically on issues of transitions and transformations of the South African settlement landscapes 

Prerequisites: HSH211/ HSH221E

 

HSS311/ HSS311E Environment and Society

Purpose: This course aims to enable learners to understand the relationship between society and ‘nature’. It focuses on the social, economic and scientific interactions between people and the natural world, and also explores the many historical dynamics of ecological transformation and common responses to these ecological crises. It further examines the diverse contemporary theories of society-nature relations, critically interrogates conventional views on society-nature relations and probes emerging 8 alternative perspectives on the role of science in mediating society-nature relations. The course also gives students a historical, theoretical and practical understanding of debates around climate change and the role of indigenous knowledge systems in coping and adapting to climate change.

Prerequisites: HSS211/ HSS221E

 

HSS321/ HSS321E Environment and Society

Purpose: This course aims to enable learners to understand the relationship between society and ‘nature’. It focuses on the social, economic and scientific interactions between people and the natural world, and also explores the many historical dynamics of ecological transformation and common responses to these ecological crises. It further examines the diverse contemporary theories of society-nature relations, critically interrogates conventional views on society-nature relations and probes emerging alternative perspectives on the role of science in mediating society-nature relations. The course also gives students a historical, theoretical and practical understanding of debates around climate change and the role of indigenous knowledge systems in coping and adapting to climate change. 

Prerequisites: HSS211/ HSS221E

 

HSA311/HSA311E Architectural Sociology

Purpose: The course will introduce students to theoretical debates concerning the relationship between the built environment and human action. The focus of the course will be on how the built environment facilitates, constrains, or even transforms various forms of human action. Amongst others, the discussion will pay attention to how human beings either collectively or individually resist, accommodate or challenge the strictures of the built environment in their everyday lives to render it amenable to their own political and socio-cultural ends. 

Prerequisite: HSS211/ HSS221E

 

HGS311/HGS311E Geographic Information Systems

Purpose: The course provides education and training in the principles and practice of Remote Sensing and GIS, and teaches students to undertake RS and GIS projects. It is focused on developing the skills required to implement technology in real world applications in the context of Human Settlement.

 

HRH321/ HRH321E Research Methods in Human Settlement

Purpose: The aim of this module is to introduce students to pertinent issues in research design, methodologies and methods (instruments) of social research. Specifically, this module will help the student to comprehend the nature of social inquiry; and to enable the student to begin participation in the research process. 

 

HPM311/ HPM311E Elements of Project Management

Purpose: This module introduces students to the fundamentals of project management and develops the knowledge that practitioners will use individually or as part of a team to oversee the implementation of specific projects such as social housing development. The module also aims to equip students with the principles and techniques for managing human settlement-related projects. 

 

HFM311/ HFM311E Elements of Financial Management

Purpose: The aim of this module is to acquaint students with financial aspects of managing projects and processes. The course does not require prior knowledge of accounting and is presented in a way that students hoping to pursue a career in the field of Human Settlement will find the knowledge useful and be able to apply principles effectively. The course builds on the understanding that one of the tasks of a Human Settlement Practitioner is to oversee/monitor the implementation of projects, and that this requires a skill-set. 

 

HME321/ HME321E Monitoring and Evaluation of Human Settlement Projects

Purpose: In the course of their career as Human Settlement Practitioners, learners will be required to either oversee the implementation of specific human settlement projects, or be involved in the monitoring and evaluation of (the implementation of) such projects. This course is designed to equip them with the knowledge and skills needed to become effective project monitors and evaluators, and places special emphasis on participatory monitoring and evaluation techniques.

 

Fourth Year Modules

 

HSH411/ HSH411E Planning for Dynamic Human Settlements

Purpose: This module is largely theoretical in nature, although associated practices are also discussed. It is intended to assist students to make necessary relationships among practices and ideas that have been discussed since the first year. Importantly, theoretical ideas are useful for thinking about a planning problem in more abstract ways (but also ideological), leading to a better understanding and way of attending to such a problem. The theoretical issues covered in this course are more subtle – they allow for thinking about the opportunities and obstacles a context provides to particular socio-economic and political practices.

Prerequisites: HSS311/ HSS311E; HSH321/ HSH321E

 

HSS411/ HSS411E Participatory community development strategies

Purpose: This module is designed to equip learners with the knowledge, skills and ideas to carry out this role, with a strong emphasis on the ‘soft skills’ essential for gaining the confidence of community members, so that projects are not perceived as bureaucratic impositions, and rather as living initiatives that are owned and crafted by the community. 

Prerequisites: HSS311/ HSS311E; HSS321/ HSS321E

 

HDS411/ HDS411E Housing delivery systems

Purpose: This module introduces learners to housing delivery systems. It also aims to equip students with knowledge concerning the different stakeholders who involved in housing delivery. 

Prerequisites: For students to register in this module, they must have completed all third-year Modules.

 

HEP411/HEP411E Ethics for Human settlement practitioners

Purpose: The purpose of this module is to provide students with sound ethical knowledge governing the human settlement sector. In particular the course will focus on the philosophical questions faced by practitioners in the built environment and human settlement practitioners more generally. Issues of the environment, the importance of culturally “significant places”, the relationship of these issues with profit and so forth will be addressed. In addition the module will cover ethical protocols, codes of conduct, and a variety of issues that are pertinent for practitioners involved in human settlement. 

Prerequisites: For students to register in this module, they must have completed all third-year modules.

 

HEL401/HEL401E Experiential Learning

This component of the qualification comprises experiential learning that is undertaken in conjunction with the Human Settlement Department, and monitored by the University. The aim is to expose students to the working environment in such a way that they gain meaningful experience whilst contributing to the various deliverables of public servants employed by the Department of Human Settlement. It also provides the location for data collection that forms part of the research project that students must complete in their 4th year. Finally, it ensures that when students graduate, they will have gained experience in working as part of a team of practitioners in the field, and will be well equipped to meet the needs of future employers.

Prerequisites: For students to register in this module, they must have completed all third-year modules

 

HRP402/HRP402E Research Project

Purpose: The aim of this module it to provide training on practical research skills. In addition, this module aims to establish a sound research base.

Prerequisites: For students to register in this module, they must have completed all third-year modules.