Professor Chinedu I.O. Okeke

Qualifications:    PhD in Sociology of education, University of Nigeria, Nsukka; Master of Arts in Education studies, London Metropolitan University, England; Bachelor of Arts in Educational Foundations and History, University of Port Harcourt, Nigeria; and Nigeria Certificate of Education (NCE), Institute of Education, University of Benin, Nigeria.

Position:              Full Professor: Sociology of Education

Phone Number:  (+27) (0) 43 704 7261

Email:    cokeke@ufh.ac.za

 

Teaching areas of specialisation:

Foundations of education modules including Sociology of education; psychology of education; and Philosophy of education; as well as microteaching

 

Research interests:

My main research areas include early childhood education (ECD), and parental participation in the education of their children. Specifically, my research concerns how young people develop during their education studies from early childhood up until their late teens, and in particular how their personal goals and life experiences can enable them to transcend the potential that appears to be laid out for them by their socio-economic origins. In recent years, social capital theory appears to assume a new role in my research with particular reference to James Coleman: Social Capital in the creation of human capital and Francis Fukuyama: Social capital and civil society. I found some link between social capital theory and my broader research agenda. I am more interested in the analysis of social capital in the creation of human capital by James Coleman. Coleman sees social capital as defined by its function. He notes that social capital is not a single entity but a variety of entities with two elements in common; consisting of some aspects of social structures, and facilitating certain actions of actors – whether person or corporate actors within the structure. Coleman notes that social capital is productive, making possible the achievement of certain ends that in its absence would not be possible. Most importantly, Coleman notes that both social capital in the family and social capital in the community play roles in the creation of human capital. Seeing that a functional ECD policy framework and programmes of action, is a social capital mechanism, this particular theoretical perspective has been fundamental in my personal research as well as those of my postgraduate students. Currently, this particular theory is currently influential within various research endeavours in which I am involved. Mainly, the social capital theory is applied in numerous parental involvement in ECD studies that try to explicate various influences on fathers capacities to effective participate in the early education of their children up until the age of nine years. 

 

Publications (last five years):

Books

1.       Okeke, CIO., Wolhuter, CC., Adu, EO., van Wyk, MM., & Abongdia, JA (Eds) (2016). Learn to teach: A handbook for teacher education. Cape Town: Oxford University Press.  ISBN: 9780190411794; E-pub ISBN: 9780190412869

2.       Okeke, C. I. O., & van Wyk, M. M. (2015). Educational Research: An African Approach. Cape Town: Oxford University Press. ISBN: 9780190409135, e-pub: 9780199047871.

3.       Okeke, C. I. O., van Wyk, M. M., & Phasha, N. T. (Eds) (2014). Schooling, society and inclusive education: An African perspective. Cape Town: Oxford University Press. ISBN 9780199077809

4.       Okeke, C. I. O. & Mndebele, C. B. S. (Eds) (2013). Education reforms in the SADC Region: Challenges and responses in the 21st Century. Rosemead, CA, USA: Scientific & Academic Publishers. ISBN: 978-1-938681-03-5 http://www.sapub.org/book

5.       Ekeanyanwu, N. T. & Okeke, C. I. O. (Eds.) (2010). Indigenous societies and cultural Globalization in the 21st Century: Is the global village truly real? Germany: VDM Publishing House. ISBN-13: 978-363925760-1

6.       Okeke, C. I. O. (2010d). Gender and schooling: A qualitative study of teens’ perception of schooling in a Nigerian suburb. Germany: VDM Publishing House. ISBN: 978-3-639-26871-3

 

Chapters in books

1.       Okeke, CIO (2015). Achieving qualitative validity, reliability and generalisability. In CIO Okeke & MM van Wyk (2015), Educational research: An African approach (pp. 207-223). Cape Town: Oxford University Press Southern Africa.

2.       Okeke, C. I. O. (2014). The meaning and practice of educational theory. In CIO. Okeke, MM van Wyk & N. T. Phasha (Eds) (July, 2014). Schooling, society and inclusive education: An African perspective (pp. 1-16). Cape Town: Oxford University Press.

3.       Okeke, C. I. O. (2013). Modelling effective home – school partnership: Lesson from context specific background. In C. I. O. Okeke & C. B. S. Mndebele (Eds). Education reforms in the SADC region: Challenges and responses in the 21st century. Rosemead, CA, USA: Scientific & Academic Publishers. ISBN: 978-1-938681-03-5

4.       Okeke, C. I. O. (2010c). Africanisation and Cultural globalization: A convergence or subservience of culture? In N. T. Ekeanyanwu & C. I. O. Okeke. Indigenous societies and cultural Globalization in the 21st Century: Is the global village truly real? Germany: VDM Publishing House. ISBN-13: 978-363925760-1

 

Peer-reviewed journal articles

1.       Mathwasa J., OkekeC.I.O. (2016). Educators’ perspectives on fathers’ participation in the early childhood education of their children. International Journal of Educational Sciences, 13(2): 172-185.

2.       Sotuku, N, Okeke, CIO & Mathwasa, J. (2016). Early childhood provisioning for children between 3 to 5 years within rural Eastern Cape Communities:  The untold stories of the physical environment. Journal of Human Ecology, 54(1): 25-34.

3.       Mathwasa, J & Okeke, CIO (2016). Barriers educators face in involving fathers in the education of their children in the foundation phase. J Soc Sci, 46(3): 229-240.

4.       Mncanca M, Okeke CIO & Fletcher R. (2016). Black fathers’ participation in early childhood development in South Africa: What do we know? J Soc Sci, 46(3): 202-213.

5.       Shumba J, Rembe S, Maphosa C, Sotuku N, Adu EO, Drake ML, Duku N, & Okeke CIO. (2016). Causes of work related teacher stress in early childhood development: A qualitative analysis. J Soc Sci, 46(3): 214-223.

6.       Okeke, CIO & Drake, ML (2015). Protecting children’s rights in early childhood research in South Africa: What ethical measures are in place? International Journal of Education Sciences, 10(2): 229-240.

7.       Okeke, CIO, Shumba, J, Rembe, S., & Sotuku, N. (2015). Demographic variables, work-stimulated stressors and coping strategies of pre-school educators: A concept paper. Journal of Psychology, 6(1): 91-101.

8.       Mpahla, NE & Okeke, CIO (2015a). Junior secondary educators’ views on the strategies for implementing continuing professional development programmes in one rural education district. Studies of Tribes and Tribal, 13(1): 10-21.

9.       Mpahla, NE & Okeke, CIO (2015b). The rurality of continuing professional teacher development (CPTD). Studies of Tribes and Tribal, 13(1): 22-33

10.   Adu, EO & Okeke, CIO (2014). Factors affecting teachers’ participation in continuing professional development (CPD): Lecturers’ perspectives. Journal of Sociology and Social Anthropology, 5(3): 271-281.

11.   Okeke, CIO, Adu, EO, Drake, ML, & Duku, NS (2014). Correlating demographic variables with occupational stress and coping strategies of pre-school educators: A literature review. Journal of Psychology, 5(2): 143-154.

12.   Okeke, CIO & Mazibuko GF (2014). Inclusion and mainstreaming: Challenges faced Swazi parents of school children with special education needs. Int J Edu Sci, 7(1): 9-20.

13.   Okeke CIO (2014). Effective home-school partnership: Some strategies to help strengthen parental involvement. South African Journal of Education, 34(3):

14.   Nxumalo, KN, Okeke, CIO & Mammen, KJ (2014). Cultural beliefs and practices towards HIV/AIDS amongst Swazi high school learners. Studies on Ethno-Medicine, 8(2): 135-146.

15.   Thwala, SK; Okeke, CIO & Mabuza, N (2014). Single parenting and its effects on the psychosocial development of children in Swaziland. Mediterranean Journal of Social Sciences, 5(23): 2252-2262.

16.   Okeke, CIO (2014). Learning from ‘good’ practice: what could African [universities] possibly learn from the bologna process and European students’ mobility? African Journal of Pedagogy and Curriculum, 1(1): 58-71.

17.   Okeke, CIO & Mazibuko, GF (2014). The experiences of parents of school children with special education needs: An empirical study. Mediterranean Journal of Social Sciences, 5(15): 227-240.

18.   Dlamini, SC, Okeke, CIO & Mammen, KJ (2014). An investigation of work-related stress among high school teachers in the Hhohho region of Swaziland. Mediterranean Journal of Social Sciences, 5(15): 575-586.

19.   Okeke, CIO & Adu, EO (2014). Statistical pitfalls: Problems with the statistical representation of fieldwork data from social research. Mediterranean Journal of Social Sciences, 5(20): 1448-1456.  

20.   Okeke, CIO & Drake, ML (2014). Teacher as role model: The South African position on the character of the teacher. Mediterranean Journal of Social Sciences, 5(20): 1728-1737.    

21.   Okeke, C. I. O., & Dlamini, S. C. (2013). An empirical study of stressors that impinge on teachers in secondary school in Swaziland. South African Journal of Education, 33(1): 32-43.

22.   Okeke, C. (2012). A neglected impediment to true Africanisation of African higher education curricula: Same agenda, differential fee regimes. Journal of Higher Education in Africa, 8(2), 39-52.

23.   Okeke, C. I. O. (2012). Bullying as gendered violence: Girls talk of their classroom experiences within a heterogeneous classroom. EDUCARE: International Journal for Educational Studies, 5(1): 1 -14.

24.   Okeke, C. I. O. (2011). Domestic and international tuition fees in African universities: Might this impede the quest for Africanisation of higher education? Journal of Studies in International Education, 15(5): 429-444.

25.   Okeke, C. I. O. (2010e). An encounter with the supervisor’s and institutional discourses: A personal reflective account. Southern African Review of Education, 16(1), 114-130.  

26.   Okeke, C. I. O. (2010b). Guilty or not guilty? How Nigerian homes impede the aspirations of Nigerian girls for higher education. US-China Education Review, 7(6), 16-30.

27.   Okeke, C. I. O. (2010a). A neglected impediment to true Africanisation of African higher education curricula: Same Agenda; different fee regimes. Journal of Higher Education in Africa, 8(2), 39-52.